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Upcoming Events

Strategies of Resistance and Refusal: The Politics of Citizenship, Indigeneity, and Historiography in Post-Mao China

March 18, 2023

5:45 PM - 7:15 PM

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Amidst state-sponsored colonization and assimilation, China’s indigenous ethno-religious minorities have negotiated their identities, status and citizenship in complex and mediated ways. Taking the post-Mao period since the 1980s as their focus, the four studies in this panel examine the struggles that minorities groups across China’s northwest, southwest, and northeast regions have undergone, and the strategies they have adopted, in response to anti-Muslim racism, ethnic assimilation, and dispossession of indigenous groups’ ancestral land and resources. Piecing together their polyphonic responses to the cyber neologism “muhei” (“Muslim haters”) through participant observation, interviews, and life histories, Jing Wang examines the intimate, embodied, and mediated ways in which Sinophone Muslims interpret anti-Muslim racism. Focusing on a Central Asian politics of refusal in the face of dispossession by the Chinese state, Guldana Salimjan investigates the ways in which Turkic Muslim Kazakhstani citizens in Xinjiang have inserted themselves into negotiations between Kazakhstan and the Xinjiang government over the issues of citizenship and ancestral land entitlement. Applying the question of indigeneity to China’s southwest region of Guizhou Province, Yu Luo addresses Tai-speaking Buyi intellectuals’ intervention in the historiography of imperial expansion and assimilation through their use of oral histories, ritual and genealogical records, and contemporary heritage promotions to claim indigeneity and ethnic distinctiveness from the Han settler population. Martin Fromm examines historiographical controversies and debates in China’s northeast borderlands, comparatively evaluating the perspectives of Han and ethnic minority intellectuals in co-constructing and counterposing narratives of ethnic diversity, assimilation, and particularity during the post-Mao transition in the 1980s.

Organizer/Chair
Martin T Fromm

Discussant
Michael J Hathaway

Presentations

An Ordinary Anthropology of Muhei: Islamophobia with Chinese Characteristics in Post-Mao China
Jing Wang

Weaponized Citizenship: Negotiating Indigeneity between China and Kazakhstan
Guldana Salimjan, Indiana University

Claiming Indigeneity: The Paradox of Frontier Identities in Guizhou, Southwest China
Yu Luo, University of Puget Sound

Debating Destiny: Post-Mao Politics of Re-Situating Ethnic Minorities in China's Northeast Borderlands
Martin T Fromm, Worcester State University

Inteviews and Podcasts

Interviews and Podcasts

September 20th, 2022

Mycological Society of San Francisco Meeting
Dr. Michael J. Hathaway:
What a Mushroom Lives For: Matsutake and the Worlds They Make

While much of the scientific literature describes their lives in mechanistic ways, Michael suggests that fungi are actively encountering and engaging with the world. Influenced by important thinkers such as the Potawatomi scientist, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Michael shows how we better understand fungi as perceiving and interpreting beings that are shaping the world through their everyday actions. Such a vision, he contends, might help us more beyond our tendencies towards seeing our fellow kin as resources, as utilitarian objects for the plate or for profit and to dethrone the idea of humans as fundamentally and qualitatively different from all other living beings.

Summer 2022

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antennae - summer 2022 - issue 58
 
What a Mushroom Lives For
In conversation: Michael J. Hathaway and Mendel Skulski

What a Mushroom Lives For, Michael J. Hathaway’s new book, pushes today’s mushroom renaissance
in compelling new directions. For centuries, Western science has promoted a human- and animal- centric framework of what counts as action, agency, movement, and behavior.

August 8th, 2022

Breakthrough Journal 

​Matsutake’s Journeys
What one mushroom tells us about war, trade, diet, and ecology.

Lightly edited excerpt from What a Mushroom Lives For.

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July 26th, 2022

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June 15th, 2022

In this interview conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher, Dr. Hathway gives us a surprise-filled journey into science and human culture, this exciting and provocative book shows how fungi shape our planet and our lives in strange, diverse, and often unimaginable ways.
 

June 15th, 2022

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May 21st, 2022
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April 7th, 2021

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Future Ecologies Podcast
2022: In Conversation with Michael Hathaway 
Available via the Future Ecologies Patreon and forthcoming in Antennae Journal (link will be posted when available)

2021: FE 3.6 - Making Sense of Each Other
Featuring Michael Hathaway, Merlin Sheldrake, and Anicka Yi
Hosted by Mendel Skulski and Adam Huggins

May 12th, 2020

Alive Magazine

"The Secret Life of Fungi" interview with Michael J. Hathaway by Isabela Vera

September 3rd, 2020

Cornell University

Cornell East Asia Program Conversations Podcast:
"Transforming More-than-human Economies in Southwest China: The role of the Matsutake Mushroom"

May 13th, 2016

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Rice University's Culture's of Energy Podcast:
Dr. Michael Hathaway offers a different perspective on Chinese air pollution; we talk about wind as medium, metaphor and material force and about how the rise of environmental sensibility is changing politics and society in China today. What is China’s role as a global citizen?

December 28th, 2013

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Event Recordings

Event Recordings

June 15th, 2022

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Michael J. Hathaway, Spencer Greening, and Mendel Skulski

THE LIVELINESS OF ALL BEINGS

At Massy Arts Gallery What a Mushroom Lives For book launch

Massy Arts and Massy Books Present Michael Hathaway in conversation with Spencer Greening (La'goot) on the ways that Western science often limits our understandings of the many living beings we share our lives with.

The researchers discuss different mushrooms, trees, and salmon, among many other species to show what the world might look like through ways of seeing that recognize the liveliness of all things. Hathaway will draw mainly from his work with Yi peoples of Himalayan China as well as a handful of unorthodox scientists in the Global North, and Spencer from Gitga’at and other Indigenous understandings.

Agency and Relating to The Species Around Us
Agency and Relating to The Species Around Us
11:28
Play Video

Agency and Relating to The Species Around Us

Laws of The Natural World
09:00
Play Video

Laws of The Natural World

Alternative Episemologies
05:01
Play Video

Alternative Episemologies

May 10th, 2022

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Michael J. Hathaway Presents: What a Mushroom Lives For

In conversation with Willoughby Arevalo and Mendel Skulski

THINKING ABOUT FUNGAL AGENCY

Vancouver Mycological Society Meeting

VMS member Michael J. Hathaway draws from his recently published book What a Mushroom Lives For, the second book in an academic trilogy that began with Anna L. Tsing’s The Mushroom at the End of the World.

Moving from fungi as an enigmatic kingdom that transformed the ancient Earth to the realm of the fascinating matsutake mushroom on the Tibetan Plateau, Hathaway reveals the ways these mushrooms are creating their own multispecies encounters, with and without humans. This book challenges a legacy of human exceptionalism and human supremacy that is dominant in Western thinking and offers ways to notice the creative liveliness of all organisms, from mammals to mushrooms.